Sunday, March 24, 2019

Review: Confidential

Confidential Confidential by Ellie Monago
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I have mixed feelings about this book, hence the 3 star rating.

What I liked:
*Anything psychology related, in treatment therapy being the holy grail of subject matter for me.
*The sucky therapist gets murdered.
*The murderer doesn't get punished for killing before mentioned sucky therapist.

What I hated:
*Pretty much every character, especially the women, but even the detective investigating the murder.
*Who the killer turned out to be because if you read the book, you're probably with me on how that should have gone down.
*Female characters written as stereotypical, weak willed fools . All of them. Every female in the book is written that way and it got old quickly.

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Review: The One

The One The One by John Marrs
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I put this one off for some reason and now I think it was the universe making sure I had the time to devote because I absolutely DEVOURED this!

Each chapter is from the viewpoint of one character and something is revealed right before the chapter change that makes you want to strangle Marrs. But that's how you end up making a dent in your couch because you can't stop reading. Despite some rather unrealistic occurrences, The One was a unique plot, well written, well paced and full of characters both despicable and delightful.

I will recommend this book to all of my bookies.

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Review: Passage to Sunrise: A novel

Passage to Sunrise: A novel Passage to Sunrise: A novel by Bruno Jambor
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

For readers who enjoy espionage, terrorist plots, clandestine government operations and the stereotypical macho action, Passage to Sunrise by Bruno Jambor looks to be a par for the course novel. However, this one melds into something unique as it finds itself listed on Religious and Christian reading lists. I did not see that coming and to be honest, if the faith based background had been prominently declared, I might have rolled my eyes because... well, the two genres aren't traditionally paired plot-wise, right?

Mr. Jambor is a talented writer who creates memorable characters and weaves a sense of reality through his entire story that feels organic. At the end the reader finds out there is a prequel available called Wildfire in the Desert. I am a reader that drools for a prequel to a story I love so I'm sure many fans will be rushing to devour that as well.

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Saturday, March 16, 2019

Review: Leverage the Field for Success: Using Quantum Reality to Succeed in the Corporate World

Leverage the Field for Success: Using Quantum Reality to Succeed in the Corporate World Leverage the Field for Success: Using Quantum Reality to Succeed in the Corporate World by John Jay McKey
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Leverage the Field for Success: Using Quantum Reality to Succeed in the Corporate World is a business help manual written by John Jay McKey. The author is a data analytics expert who claims that the key to success in business can be achieved using quantum reality. Basically, quantum reality is a fancy business version of using positive affirmations to bring good things into your life. Obviously it is a little more complicated than that, the word quantum should have been the first clue, but in only 178 pages, Mr. McKey spells out things quite nicely. People in business from CEO to low level managers can find wisdom here that will help along the past to success.

Though I am not in business in the traditional sense, I found this book to be positive and clearly articulated. I see this as a book that can only help both the business and people involved in business be quite successful.

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Review: The Helpers: An international tale of Espionage and Corruption

The Helpers: An international tale of Espionage and Corruption The Helpers: An international tale of Espionage and Corruption by S.E. Nelson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

At 451 pages, this is not a one afternoon beach read. The Helpers: An international tale of Espionage and Corruption by S.E. Nelson is a meaty novel featuring murder, intrigue, corruption, romance, and suspense. Set in Congo, a notorious place of nearly constant unrest and violence, The Helpers are a powerful underground group trying to maintain control of the natural resources of the country. An American journalist arrives to document the resistance and finds herself in immeasurable danger when she uncovers multiple levels of corruption including a brutal murder.

Nelson has a writing style that is direct, which is perfect for this kind of story. The suspense and underlying danger of the plot demands that but beyond the assertiveness of the work, there is a tenderness underlying everything. That softness is where the reader finds the room to care about these characters and what happens to them. Some may call this dark subject matter but I found a hopefulness about it.

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